MODULE AIMS

p. 1
ED4068
Key Principles for Inclusion
Term(s) 1 2 3
p. 2
School of Education and Communities
CONTACT INFORMATION……………………………………………………………………………….3
MODULE LEADER…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3
ADDITIONAL CONTACT(S) …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….3
MODULE INTRODUCTION……………………………………………………………………………….4
MODULE AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES ……………………………………………………………………………………4
KEY INFORMATION ………………………………………………………………………………………..5
ASSESSMENT INFORMATION ………………………………………………………………………..9
REASSESSMENT ARRANGEMENTS ……………………………………………………………………………………………….16
LATE SUBMISSIONS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………16
RETURN OF WORK AND FEEDBACK ………………………………………………………………………………………………17
ONLINE SYSTEM FAILURES ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….18
TEACHING SCHEDULE …………………………………………………………………………………18
ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………20
REFERENCING……………………………………………………………………………………………..21
ASSESSMENT FEEDBACK……………………………………………………………………………21
WHAT IS FEEDBACK? ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….21
WHY IS FEEDBACK IMPORTANT?………………………………………………………………………………………………….21
WHERE DO I GET FEEDBACK? ………………………………………………………………………………………………………22
READING AND RESOURCES ………………………………………………………………………..22
CORE:……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….22
OTHER RESOURCES AND FORMS:…………………………………………………………………………………………………23
KEY LINKS……………………………………………………………………………………………………23
p. 3
CONTACT INFORMATION
MODULE LEADER

Name: Joe Allix
Email: [email protected]

AssignmentTutorOnline

ADDITIONAL CONTACT(S)

Name: click or tap here to add your NAME
Role: click or tap here to add your ROLE

The Module Leader/Other Tutors and Contact Details were correct at point of
publication. You will be notified of any changes.

p. 4
MODULE INTRODUCTION
ED4068 is a core module on the Early Childhood Studies, Special Education, and Education
Studies programmes. We will explore the current debates, and identify the skills,
competencies and experiences that inform inclusive practices with a particular focus on
children and young people (CYP) with Special Educational Needs and disabilities (SEND).
Incorporated within this we will consider how society views CYP with SEND, intersectionality
between SEND and other groups as identified within society and the impact this may have
on educational experiences.
MODULE AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES
MODULE AIMS
To provide a broad and critical historical review of the development of the field of Special
Educational
Needs and Disability (SEND), and the legislative frameworks underpinning its practice.
· To introduce and develop awareness of concepts, terms, definitions and debates within the
field
· To introduce critical disability studies and consider the experience of SEN and Disability for
diverse
social groups
· To provide a critique of the individual deficit model of disability and a critical focus of social
oppression theory in the context of commitment to equal opportunities and human rights
MODULE LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of this module, students will be able to:
Knowledge
1) Evaluate the impact of government legislation, guidelines, policies and practices
relating to
special educational needs and disabilities

p. 5
2) Analyse and evaluate the models of disability
3) Describe the concept of intersectionality as it relates to inequality in education.
Thinking skills
4) Explore the ways in which disability discourses are located in wider political
discourses of equal opportunities and human rights
5) Examine a diverse range of practices and provision for children with SEND,
including early
intervention and multi-agency practice.
Subject-based practical skills and Skills for life and work (general skills)
6) Demonstrate appropriate use of a range of technological tools to facilitate studies
and present knowledge and understanding of key concepts
7) Demonstrate relevant academic literacy skills in formative and summative
assessments.
KEY INFORMATION
This Module Guide formalises the requirements of you and your tutors for effective learning
to take place during your studies, including:
a week-by-week list of topics to be covered by the module;
a description of the assessment criteria to be used during the module;
a statement of the nature, pattern and timing of the assessment;
the dates and times by which all assignments must be submitted and
details of the process for doing this.
Please ensure that you read this guide carefully and check the module Teams and Moodle
sites, and your UEL Direct timetable for any changes to the information provided.

p. 6
Students are expected to:
participate fully, honestly, and appropriately in the learning process especially
during class time;
attend all lectures, seminars and arranged tutorials;
keep an informal journal (we recommend OneNote for this) that can help with
the later process of formal reflection
engage in the online/guided learning activities
switch all mobile phones and electronic devices to silent in class;
provide explanations of enforced absences;
hand all assignments in on time following published procedures;
complete 200 hours of study (including assessed work and time-tabled /selfdirected/online activities) for this 20-credit module;
Engage with the seminar reading tasks and arrive at the seminars prepared
to engage in respectful discussion and feedback
regularly check their communication channels (e.g. Teams messages,
Outlook emails and notice-boards and the module Moodle site)
for further
reading and resources and other important information relating to the module
keep their records with the School up to date.
The module leader and other teaching staff (where relevant) will:
Ensure the lecture materials are available to view at least 48 hours before the
session
Provide additional further reading in advance of the seminar session
Curate and make available approved open/online learning resources
Provide assessment support and guidance in line with the UEL assessment
policy
Provide constructive and useful feedback to students on the assessments in
line with the UEL assessment policy.
‘Capture’ all or part of the lecture session using appropriate technology and
post this online as soon as possible after seminars or lectures

p. 7
Factors to consider regarding this module
ED4068 is a Core module shared by three individual Courses, (Early Childhood
Studies, Special Education, and Education Studies). Your seminar groups will –
where possible – by organised in accordance with which Course you are
registered on.
Some of the issues discussed on this module can be quite upsetting. Your
module tutor will advise you of this in advance of the session.
As with all your modules at UEL, we welcome interactive debate and discussion.
However, please remember to consider the views and perspectives of other
group members and maintain professional courtesy at all times.
Teaching on this module is split between one 90 minute lecture one 90 minute
seminar and one 60 minute workshop across a set number of weeks. The nature
of these sessions may change from week to week. For example, the lecture time
may involve periods of active enquiry/research away from the lecture hall. The
seminar may involve group and individual work and will include group tutorials
close to the assessment deadline.
This is intended as a hybrid on-campus/online module. However, attendance is
still mandatory at organised seminars and lectures, unless you are notified
otherwise. In cases where attendance is not needed on campus, we will aim to
inform you up 48 hours before the event where practicable.
Due to the requirement for all lecture sessions to be ‘captured’ and in the current
climate of dual delivery, TEAMS will be used for the lecture and will be recorded.
The seminar will operate within university Covid 19 guidance and is therefore
likely to be a combination of on campus and TEAMS delivery, seminars will not
be recorded. This will enable students to share their own experiences,
perspectives and discuss materials within smaller groups. Students must adhere
to relevant confidentiality protocols and avoid naming people/places when
sharing their experiences.
During taught sessions on campus and online, we will invite you to reflect on
your personal journeys and stories, and also invite you to hear those of others.
However, it should be noted that the content of the module is not intended as
group therapy. It is, rather, a series of models of thinking and re-thinking that,
upon application, can be used to help you realise your academic and
professional potential and further progress in your studies. Students
experiencing mental wellbeing difficulties (triggered, for example, by group
discussion, personal reflection, or the stories of others) are strongly advised to
contact the UEL Wellbeing team (
[email protected] or via The Hub on 0208 223
4444
) to discuss any personal wellbeing issues.
This module emphasises the value of emotional, physical, social, cultural and
other intelligences. Accordingly, students are required to display the same levels

p. 8
of professionalism and respect that graduates in their field would be required to
demonstrate.
This module has no pre-cursor modules, and is a core module alongside all
other Level 4 modules on your programme.
Standard UEL deadlines for module registration apply.

p. 9
ASSESSMENT INFORMATION
Assessment:
ED4068 – KEY PRINCIPLES FOR INCLUSION

Part Assessment Type Word
count
Part 1 Explore inclusion in education in relation
to SEND and use examples to show
how this can be successful.
1500
Part 2 Explain intersectionality and
demonstrate the relationship with
SEND.
1500
Due
date
Tuesday 3rd May 2:59pm

Important Notes:
This will be one portfolio in two parts.
You will need to use theory taught across the module to support your work.
Weighting:
Weighting 100% in total
Total word count 3000
Submission:
You are required to submit one portfolio via Turnitin. The Turnitin link will be
available closer to the time via Moodle. This assignment is on one Word
document only.
Support
There will be support on Moodle for your assessment. We will engage in
writing activities in the seminar sessions where a mix of peer and seminar lead
activities will be used.

p. 10

Part 1 Explore inclusion in education in relation to SEND and use
examples to show how this can be successful
.
1500
You will need to define important terminology such as inclusion and SEND. You will
need to make links to important legislation and the values of policy. You will need to
ensure you have explored this from different perspectives such as from the social or
medical models of disability. It will be important to consider human rights and equality
when demonstrating ways that we can ensure inclusive practices are successful.
Introduction (Approx. 250 words) Start your work by explaining what inclusion is. You will want
to define this and use academic sources to support this definition. You will then want to define
SEND and again use academic sources to support this. You will briefly signpost the reader to the
key areas of discussion in your work that explore the links between inclusion and SEND. For
this it
may be that you introduce the concept of models of disability, human rights and equality.
Main (Approx. 1000 words) As you enter into discussions here about the key areas you are
discussing you will want to show your understanding of models of disability. You will need to
mainly focus on the social and medical models but should show there are other models that
can be considered. It is important to show how inclusion for CYP with SEND may look different
according to the model you are exploring. This helps you to show a range of perspectives and is
the start of criticality in your writing. You will want to show the pros and cons of understanding
inclusion and SEND from both of the key models of disability. This will automatically lead you to
consider equality and human rights and you are likely to want to introduce one or two topics
from taught sessions in your writing. These topics will be dependent on the point you want to
make within your discussion. This will be supported from the reading you explore in the taught
sessions but also from your own research and findings.
When exploring your own reading make sure you use authentic and reliable sources. The library
is a good source and there is support available to help you with your searches. You are likely to
use websites for some information. However, these are not always reliable. They are often
writing to a specific audience and therefore will often offer a skewed perspective. Therefore, it
is important that you consider this information carefully and critique it in relation to its
purpose. We will discuss this during our sessions for further clarity.
You will want to use a limited number of examples to show how the theory, legislation or policy
you are explaining relates to practice. For example, what the medical model of disability may
look like in relation to decision making on support for a CYP with SEND. These may be real
examples you have experienced in practice; observed in your own settings as students or you
may have used examples form literature. Ensure the examples used demonstrate the key point
you are explaining and that you have made this explicit.
Conclusion (Approx. 250 words) You should summarise the key parts you have written about
here and make links to the introductory paragraph. Do not introduce any new literature or
examples here. Consider the ‘so what’ of the discussion you have had so far. Draw together the
key points and remind the reader of the key arguments.
Part 2 Explain intersectionality and show the relationship
with SEND.
1500
You will need to define important terminology such as intersectionality and other key
terms you intend to explore in this section. However you will not need to define SEND
as you will already have done this. You
must make the links between intersectionality

p. 11

and SEND clear. You will need to make links to important theories, legislation and
policy. You will want to ensure you have used theory to show how the relationship
between SEND and other social groups are entwined and the impact on the educational
experiences of the individual concerned.
Introduction (Approx. 250 words) Start your work by explaining what intersectionality is. You
will want to define this and use academic sources to support this definition. You will then want
to explain why you are relating this to SEND specifically and again use academic sources to
support this. You will briefly signpost the reader to the key areas of discussion in your work that
explore the links between intersectionality and SEND and you will include references to the key
theories you use to do this such as critical race theory and social oppression theory.
Main (Approx. 1000 words) As you enter into discussions here about the key areas you are
discussing you will want to show your understanding of the relationship between different
groups of people as defined by societal constructs and how these will impact upon the
understanding of individual with SEND and the decisions made about them in education. It is
important to discuss these rather than describe the impact. You need to write from differing
viewpoints and show differing perspectives on this. This helps you to bring criticality into your
writing. Again, This will automatically lead you to consider equality and human rights and you
are likely to want to introduce one or two topics from taught sessions in your writing. However,
you must ensure you do not repeat yourself and anything you have written in part 1. Therefore,
although this may lead you to consider these areas, if there are areas that are relevant that you
have not discussed then it is good practice to note their value but to go on to explore other
relevant concepts. These topics will be dependent on the point you want to make within your
discussion. This will be supported from the reading you explore in the taught sessions but also
from your own research and findings.
When exploring your own reading make sure you use authentic and reliable sources. The library
is a good source and there is support available to help you with your searches. You are likely to
use websites for some information. However, these are not always reliable. They are often
writing to a specific audience and therefore will often offer a skewed perspective. Therefore, it
is important that you consider this information carefully and critique it in relation to its
purpose. We will discuss this during our sessions for further clarity.
Conclusion (Approx. 250 words) You should summarise the key parts you have written about
here and make links to the introductory paragraph. Do not introduce any new literature or
examples here. Consider the ‘so what’ of the discussion you have had so far. Draw together the
key points and remind the reader of the key arguments.

Weighting:
This assessment is 100% of the module.
Due date / time:
Tuesday 3rd May
Learning outcomes assessed:
At the end of this module, students will be able to:
Knowledge
p. 12
1) Evaluate the impact of government legislation, guidelines, policies and practices
relating to
special educational needs and disabilities
2) Analyse and evaluate the models of disability
3) Describe the concept of intersectionality as it relates to inequality in education.
Thinking skills
4) Explore the ways in which disability discourses are located in wider political
discourses of equal opportunities and human rights
5) Examine a diverse range of practices and provision for children with SEND,
including early
intervention and multi-agency practice.
Subject-based practical skills and Skills for life and work (general skills)
6) Demonstrate appropriate use of a range of technological tools to facilitate studies
and present knowledge and understanding of key concepts
7) Demonstrate relevant academic literacy skills in formative and summative
assessments.
Assessment criteria:

%
Mar
k
Knowledge
LO1 ,2, 3
Thinking
LO 4, 5
Subject based and
practical skills for life
and work (general
skills)
LO 6, 7

p. 13

80-
100
%
In-depth knowledge of
contemporary debates
on inclusion in
education
.
Thorough use of
relevant legislation and
policy to evidence
thinking and
approaches. Relevant
academic literature has
been used effectively
and critically to
generate and support
ideas.
Evidence of a high level of
independent and critical
thinking in relation to SEND
and intersectionality and
inequality discourse and
demonstrate originality in the
application of theory and
legislation when examining
approaches to the range of
practices and provision for
Children and Young People
with SEND.
Reference list reflects a
high level of independent
academic reading
relevant to the module.
There is evidence of
sustained critical
evaluation and
interpretation. Engages
with relevant ethical,
cultural and social issues
in relation to inclusion.
Citations to references
are comprehensive and
accurate
throughout. Reference list
accurately formatted.
Style of writing lends
itself to academia.
70-
79%
Wide ranging
knowledge of
contemporary debates
on inclusion in
education. Relevant
academic literature has
been used to generate
and support ideas
which demonstrate the
range of perspectives
across society.
Evidence of critical thinking in
relation to inclusive practices
with regard to SEND and
intersectionality and inequality.
Evidence of consideration
where inequality has influenced
change. Accounts for ethical,
cultural and social issues.
Use a wide range of
academic sources from
the module and evidence
of independent reading.
There is sustained
evaluation and/or
interpretation of sources
and evidence of critical
thinking.
The citations to
references and reference
list are comprehensive
and accurate
throughout.
Style of writing lends
itself to academia.

p. 14

69-
69%
Knowledge of
contemporary debates
on inclusion in
education. A range of
relevant academic
literature has been used
to support ideas.
Emerging evidence of critical
thinking in relation to with
regard to SEND and
intersectionality and inequality
within inclusive contexts.
Accounts for relevant ethical,
cultural and social issues.
Reference list reflects
evidence of engagement
with a range of academic
reading from module and
beyond. There is
evidence of evaluation
and/or interpretation of
sources throughout.
Engages with relevant
ethical, cultural and
social issues.
The citations to
references and reference
list are accurately
formatted but there may
be a few errors. 
50-
59%
Demonstrates
understanding of
contemporary debates
on inclusion in
education. Literature
has been used to
support ideas.
Demonstrates understanding of
SEND and intersectionality and
inequality in relation to
inclusion. Accounts for ethical,
cultural and/or social issues
(mainly from one perspective).
Reference list and
citations in text evidences
engagement with
academic reading from
module throughout the
assignment. There is
some attempt to
evaluate/interpret the
sources of information.
Engages with ethical,
cultural and/or social
issues (mainly from one
perspective).
Citations to references
are formatted accurately
but they may have minor
errors.  List of references
is mainly accurate in
format but may have
errors.

p. 15

40-
49%
Learning outcomes
are met.
Demonstrates some
understanding of
contemporary debates
on inclusion in
education but mainly
summarises facts.
Learning outcomes are met.
Demonstrates some
understanding of SEND and
intersectionality and inequality
in relation to inclusion.
Mentions either ethical, cultural
and/or social issues.
Learning outcomes are
met.
Reference list and
citations in text evidence
some evidence of
academic reading
relevant to the module.
The writing is
descriptive. Mentions
either ethical, cultural
and/or social issues.
Citations to references
and the reference list
include some errors.
30-
39%
LEARNING
OUTCOME NOT
FULLY MET
Limited evidence of
knowledge of
contemporary debates
on inclusion in
education. There may
be misconceptions.
LEARNING OUTCOME
NOT FULLY MET
Limited evidence of knowledge
SEND and intersectionality and
inequality in relation to
inclusion. There is no reference
to ethical, cultural and/or social
issues.
LEARNING
OUTCOME NOT
FULLY MET
Reference list and
citations in text reflect
limited evidence of
academic reading from
the module. There is no
reference to ethical,
cultural and/or social
issues.
Citations to references
and the list of references
are often inaccurately
formatted.
20-
29%
LEARNING
OUTCOME NOT
MET
Very limited evidence
of knowledge or
understanding of
contemporary debates
on i
nclusion in
education. There are
misconceptions and
inconsistencies.
LEARNING OUTCOME
NOT MET
Very limited evidence of
knowledge or understanding of
SEND and intersectionality and
inequality in relation to
inclusion. No ethical, cultural
and/or social issues have been
mentioned. There are
misconceptions and
inconsistencies.
LEARNING
OUTCOME NOT
MET
Reference list reflects
very limited evidence of
engaging with
recommended academic
reading. No ethical,
cultural and/or social
issues have been
mentioned.
Citations to references
and the list of references
are inaccurately
formatted. 

p. 16

Belo
w
20%
LEARNING
OUTCOME NOT
MET
There is no evidence of
knowledge or
understanding of
contemporary debates
on i
nclusion in
education.
LEARNING OUTCOME
NOT MET
There is no evidence of
knowledge or understanding of
SEND and intersectionality and
inequality in relation to
inclusion. No ethical, cultural
and/or social issues have been
mentioned.
LEARNING
OUTCOME NOT
MET
There is no evidence of
any recommended
academic reading in the
reference list.  No ethical,
cultural and/or social
issues have been
mentioned.
The reference list is
incorrectly formatted. 

How to submit your work:
The assessment will be submitted via Turnitin. The link for this will be in the
assessment block on Moodle. Please ensure you submit a draft of your work before
the final date in order to ensure the link is working for you. You will need to contact IT
with any issues you have with this so please make sure you have time to do this.
You can submit work as many times as you wish up to the deadline and these will
replace any previous submissions.
REASSESSMENT ARRANGEMENTS
If you do not meet the assessment criteria for this asssessment you will be offered the
opportunity to complete the reassessment task during term 3. Any further instructions will be
confirmed and communicated to you nearer the time.
LATE SUBMISSIONS
We strongly suggest that you try to submit all coursework by the deadline set as
meeting deadlines is expected in employment. However, in our regulations, UEL has
permitted students to be able to submit their coursework up to 24 hours after the
deadline. The deadline will be published in your module guide. Coursework which is
submitted late, but within 24 hours of the deadline, will be assessed but subjected to
a fixed penalty of 5% of the total marks available (as opposed to marks obtained).
However, you have to
be very careful when you are submitting your
assessment
. If you submit your work twice, once using the original deadline link and
then again using the late submission link, your assignment will be graded as late with
the 5% deduction.

p. 17
Please note that if you submit twice, once before the deadline and once during the 24
hour late period, then the second submission will be marked and 5% deducted.
This rule only applies to coursework. It does not apply to examinations,
presentations, performances, practical assessments or viva voce examinations. If
you miss these for a genuine reason, then you will need to apply for
extenuating
circumstances
, or accept that you will receive a zero mark.
Extenuating Circumstances are circumstances which:
impair your examination performance prevent you from attending
examinations or other types of assessment, or
prevent you from submitting coursework or other assessed work by the
scheduled deadline date, or within 24 hours of the deadline date
Such circumstances rarely occur and would normally be:
unforeseeable – in that you could have no prior knowledge of the event
concerned, and
unpreventable – in that you could do nothing reasonably in your power to
prevent such an event, and
expected to have a serious impact on performance
You can make an application for extenuating circumstances by following this link:
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/StudentSupport/Pages/Extenuation-information.aspx
RETURN OF WORK AND FEEDBACK
Arrangements for the publication of results is stated in the Course Handbook. Formal
results are ONLY available in UEL Direct, and will be published within 8 working days
of the Board, where results are formally confirmed. Any other results are provisional /
indicative but not approved.
Work submitted will be returned to you online through Turnitin.
You will receive feedback throughout your course through the following:

one-to-one or individualised (i.e. tutorials, conversations with supervisors, or
individualised comments on assignments)
generic feedback (i.e. use of rubrics, ‘Quickmarks’ in Turnitin or
standardised forms)
peer feedback (i.e. feedback from other students)
informal feedback (i.e. through in-class discussions or online forums)
self-evaluation (i.e. online checklists or reflective submissions)
other (see below)
If you selected ‘other’, please provide details here

p. 18
Feedback and students’ marks should be provided within 15 working days of the due
date for summative work (i.e. work that counts towards the final course grade) and
formative work (i.e. work that is developmental and designed to help you improve).
Whilst feedback will be given on draft/formative work, it shouldn’t be assumed that
every aspect will be identified.
ONLINE SYSTEM FAILURES
If you experience a problem submitting your work online, you should notify your
lecturer/tutor by email immediately. However, deadlines are not extended unless
there is a significant systems problem with Turnitin. UEL has specific plans in place
to address these issues. If UEL finds that the issue with the system was significant,
you will receive an email notifying you of the issue and that you have been given a 24
hour extension.
If you don’t receive any email that specifically states you have
been given an extension, then the original deadline has not been changed
.
Best advice: Don’t wait until the last minute to submit your assessments
electronically.
A guide to submitting your work through
Turnitin:
https://moodle.uel.ac.uk/mod/book/view.php?id=762499&chapterid=46648
A guide to viewing and understanding the similarity report in Turnitin:
https://moodle.uel.ac.uk/mod/book/view.php?id=793923&chapterid=46752
Guide to Extenuating Circumstances:
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/sites/studenthandbooks/SitePages/Extenuation.aspx
Assessment & Feedback Policy:
https://www.uel.ac.uk/Discover/Governance/Policies-Regulations-Corporatedocuments/Student-Policies (click on other policies)
TEACHING SCHEDULE
We will meet weekly for a lecture which will be online. This will be a mix of pre recorded
sessions which are interspersed with activities and discussions. These will be available to
you to watch before the lecture if you wish but we will engage in the activities together.

p. 19
Each week there will be an opportunity to meet in a smaller group with a seminar lead. This
will be to engage in a variety of discussions and activities related to the topics of the week.
You will also have the opportunity to work on parts of your assessment during these
sessions. Some if this work will involve sharing small sections or paragraphs of your work
with peers for feedback so we can all support each other in developing our understanding of
the topics but also the marking criteria.

Week Topic Short guide to theme Resources
Week
1
Introduction Welcome to your course. This
week, we will give you an
overview of your course, and give
you a chance to meet your new
colleagues and teachers.
Please read the Module
guide and ensure you are
clear about key dates
Week
2
Contextual
Understanding of
SEN and
Disabilities
This week will explore labels,
definitions, and discourses, that
frame and guide our
understanding of terminology
Please refer to the week 2
folder on Moodle for this
week’s independent
reading and research
activities
Week
3
Introduction to
assessment.
This week we will examine the
assessment in detail, we will start
to think about what we will want
to include in our assessment that
that we can contextualise
theories and plan for
assessment.
Please refer to the week 3
folder on Moodle for this
week’s independent
reading and research
activities
Week
4
Legislation and
Policy
Legislation and Policy document
is a vital part of understanding
inclusive practice. This week will
introduce you to important law
and policy.
Please refer to the week 4
folder on Moodle for this
week’s independent
reading and research
activities
Week
5
Models of
Disability
Differing models of disability will
be considered
Please refer to the week 5
folder on Moodle for this
week’s independent
reading and research
activities
Week
6
Exploring
Multiple
Perspectives
and Inclusive
pedagogies:
Multiple Perspectives and
Inclusive pedagogies
Please refer to the week 6
folder on Moodle for this
week’s independent
reading and research
activities
Week
7
Exploring SEN
and Disability
and Multiple
Layers of
Oppression
SEN and Disability and Multiple
Layers of Oppression
Please refer to the week 7
folder on Moodle for this
week’s independent
reading and research
activities
Week
8
Barriers to
Participation
Barriers to participation, what
these look like, and how they can
be overcome
Please refer to the week 8
folder on Moodle for this
week’s independent

p. 20

reading and research
activities
Week
9
Empowerment
and
Participation
Empowerment and Participation Please refer to the week 9
folder on Moodle for this
week’s independent
reading and research
activities
Week
10
Essay writing
workshop
Essay writing workshop Please refer to the week 10
folder on Moodle for this
week’s independent
reading and research
activities
Week
11
Consolidation
of
themes/topics
and
implications for
practice
Consolidation of themes/topics
from across the course and
considering what this means
about our approaches to practice.
What can we do? What can we
not change and how may we
approach this?
Please refer to the week 11
folder on Moodle for this
week’s independent
reading and research
activities
Week
12
Discussion
about future
modules and
links with this
one.
TBC Independent activities and
reading for this to research
own interests in this field.

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS
As a UEL student you are expected to attend all scheduled sessions, including
lectures, seminars, group work and tutorials – whether online or face to face. You are
also expected to be punctual, to be respectful of others’ time as well as your own, to
participate whilst present, to put in time to study between classes, to prepare for
taught sessions and to be active participants in both group work and your own
learning experience.
Link to your
personal timetable:
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/students/Pages/Timetable-and-Attendance.aspx
Link to the University of East London Campus Maps:
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/Pages/Maps-and-key-buildings-at-UEL.aspx
Link to the Guide to Room Numbers:
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/sites/studenthandbooks/SitePages/Guide-to-RoomNumbers.aspx
p. 21
REFERENCING
As a student you will be taught how to write correctly referenced essays. UEL’s
standard
Harvard referencing system is from Cite Them Right. Cite them Right is
the standard Harvard referencing style at UEL for all Schools, however professional
body requirements will take precedence for instance the School of Psychology which
uses the APA system.
Link to the Student Handbook page on
Cite Them Right:
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/sites/studenthandbooks/SitePages/Cite-ThemRight.aspx
Video guide to using referencing software Zotero: https://youtu.be/WXGdRBN1Ovk
Link to the Student Handbook page on Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism:
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/sites/studenthandbooks/SitePages/AcademicMisconduct-and-Plagiarism-Home.aspx
ASSESSMENT FEEDBACK
WHAT IS FEEDBACK?
Feedback is crucial for your learning and it is an important part of the academic
cycle. It tells you what the strengths are of your work, what its weaknesses are and
how it can be improved.
WHY IS FEEDBACK IMPORTANT?
p. 22
Feedback is the most effective way to: Help you understand how to succeed in your
assessments; Help you produce better work for the future; Signpost you to other
resources for assistance.
If you pay attention to feedback, particularly where the same comment is made in
several modules, you can use the information to improve.
WHERE DO I GET FEEDBACK?
When a tutor comments on your answers in seminars/lectures/workshops
General comment on assessment performance in lectures and seminars
General comment on questions prepared for seminars
When another student makes comments on your presentation
When you produce practice questions for a tutor who gives comments
When you receive written comments on your work submitted either as coursework or
exam
When you look at general feedback on module performance on UEL Direct.
When you see your Academic Adviser with all your assessment feedback for general
advice. You should always do this after each assessment period.
Link to information about the
Centre for Student Success:
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/sites/studenthandbooks/SitePages/The-Centre-forStudent-Success.aspx
READING AND RESOURCES
CORE:
Friedrickson, N. and Cline,T. (2015) (3rd Edition) Special Educational Needs, Inclusion and
Diversity. Maidenhead: OUP

p. 23
Wearmouth, J. and Gosling, A. (2017) Understanding Special Educational Needs and Disability in
the Early Years. London: Routledge.
OTHER RESOURCES AND FORMS:
Recommended/extended
Hans, A. (2015) Disability, Gender and Trajectories of Power. London: Sage Publications
Imray, P. and Colley, A. (2017) Inclusion is Dead. Long Live Inclusion. London: Routledge
Connor, D.J. and Ferri, B.A. (2015) Disability Studies and Critical Race Theory in Education. New
York: Teachers College Press
Crutchley, R. (Ed) (2017) Special Needs and the Early Years: Partnership and Participation.
London: Sage.
Shakespeare, T. (2015) Disability Today: International Perspectives. London: Routledge
Sodatic, K. and Grech, S. (2017) Disability and Colonialism: Disencounters and Anxious
Intersectionalities.London: Routledge
Sodatic, K. and Grech, S. (2017) Disability and the Global South. The Critical Handbook. London:
Routledge.
Tutt, R. (2010) Partnership Working to Support Special Educational Needs and Disabilities.
London: Sage.
KEY LINKS
Academic Appeals
https://www.uel.ac.uk/Discover/Governance/Policies-Regulations-Corporatedocuments/Student-Policies/Student-Appeals
Academic Integrity
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/LibraryandLearningServices/Pages/Academicintegrity.aspx
Academic Tutoring
https://www.uel.ac.uk/centre-for-student-success/academic-tutoring
p. 24
Assessment and Feedback Policy
https://www.uel.ac.uk/Discover/Governance/Policies-Regulations-Corporatedocuments/Student-Policies (click on other policies)
Bus Timetable
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/EstatesandFacilitiesServices/Pages/Timetable.aspx
Centre for Student Success
https://www.uel.ac.uk/centre-for-student-success
Civic Engagement
https://www.uel.ac.uk/Connect/Civic-Engagement
Complaints procedure
https://www.uel.ac.uk/Discover/Governance/Policies-Regulations-Corporatedocuments/Student-Policies/Student-Complaint-Procedure
Counselling
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/StudentSupport/Pages/Health-And-Wellbeing.aspx
Disability support
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/StudentSupport/Pages/Disability-And-Dyslexia.aspx
Engagement & Attendance Policy
https://www.uel.ac.uk/Discover/Governance/Policies-Regulations-Corporatedocuments/Student-Policies (click on other policies)
Equality and Diversity Strategy
https://www.uel.ac.uk/Discover/Governance/Policies-Regulations-Corporatedocuments/Student-Policies (click on other policies)
Extenuation Procedures
https://www.uel.ac.uk/Discover/Governance/Policies-Regulations-Corporatedocuments/Student-Policies/Extenuation-Procedures
Frequently-Asked Questions
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/sites/studenthandbooks/ModuleGuides/SitePages/Frequ
ently-Asked-Questions.aspx
Health and Safety
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/EstatesandFacilitiesServices/Pages/health-&-
safety.aspx
IT Support
https://uelac.sharepoint.com/sites/ITServices/SitePages/Problem_Reporting/Reportin
g-Problems.aspx
Library Archives and Learning Services
https://www.uel.ac.uk/lls/
Manual of General Regulations
https://www.uel.ac.uk/Discover/Governance/Policies-Regulations-Corporatedocuments/Student-Policies/Manual-of-General-Regulations
p. 25
Mentoring
https://www.uel.ac.uk/centre-for-student-success/mentoring

Reference no: EM132069492

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